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Our Research Conference

Applied Coaching Research Conference 2020 – Maximising Potential through Coaching 

 

We return to Derby County Football Club for our third research conference on Wednesday the 26 February 2020.

The theme of the conference is Maximising Potential through Coaching, and our jam-packed programme of workshops, posters and 'Time for You' sessions will help you understand how coaching can be used to maximise the potential of people in sport and physical activity. See the full rundown below. 

Research is essential to inform the ongoing development of coaching policy and practice. The aim of the conference is to bridge the gap between research and practice by enabling researchers and practitioners to come together to learn, share and collaborate.

Want to attend? Ticket prices are:

Purchase your tickets at trybooking.com

Keynote Speakers

Keynote 1 - To be revealed soon

 

Dr Steve Ingham, Supporting Champions

Steve has a background in high-performance sport and is a world leading performance scientist. He has worked with a number of British Olympic athletes, including Sir Steve Redgrave and Dame Jessica Ennis-Hill. Steve is also the director of Supporting Champions, which he set up to help people to reach their maximum potential. 

Steve's session: Maximising Potential: Insights from High Performance Teams

  • When an athlete aspires for an extraordinary goal, something they've never achieved before, how do they and their support team best approach the goal and how do they best sustain performance? In his keynote, Steve will share some of the key insights, tensions, philosophies and concepts that underpin exceptional performance.

Edel Quin, University of Chichester and Safe in Dance International

Edel specialises in the application of dance science theory and research to the education and practice of dance. Her co-authored book ‘Safe Dance Practice. An Applied Dance Science Perspective’ was published in 2015. Edel’s work is recognised internationally, having taught at institutions such the Hong Kong Academy for Performing Arts, University of Wyoming, University of Bern, Beijing Dance Academy and the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. As a former professional dancer, Edel toured the world with Riverdance and performed for a season in London’s West End. She is currently leading the world’s first BSc (Hons) and MSci in Dance Science at the University of Chichester.  

Edel's session: An Insight from Dance: How the Evolution of Dance Science Is Informing Enhanced Approaches to Training

  • The development of dance science as a discrete discipline has influenced how dancers and their coaches are being trained. Edel's keynote will highlight some of the peculiarities of the dance coaching context; the challenges that exist in the implementation of research-informed practices, and the benefit of being open to sharing of best practice. Edel will also draw upon comparisons between the role of a dance coach and the role of a sports coach, and how to overcome the challenge of maximising individual potential within a group setting. 

Workshop Sessions

Who?

Dr Don Vinson and Dr Andy Cale, University of Worcester

Summary

We conducted a longitudinal investigation into the Strive Coach Developer Programme. Using the Value Creation Framework and the Landscapes of Practice theory, we explored the learning journeys of coach developers on the programme. Specifically, we examined the value the coach developers derived from participation - generally, they were very supportive of the overall quality of the programme.

Learning outcomes: 

  • To provide delegates with a tool (the Value Creation Framework) to help them plan, deliver and evaluate learning programmes
  • To share the different types of value which might be derived from a learning programme
  • Equip delegates to think critically about the programmes they deliver and make changes to enhance the learning of coach developers and/or coaches on their courses

Who?

Paul Garner, University of Gloucestershire

Summary

This research is about exploring the behaviours that build trust in expert coaches/instructors and coach developers in alpine skiing. Data is collected through observation and interview via stimulated recall; using video recorded extracts of coaches/coach developers working with their athletes/coaches to trigger discussion. It is only by spending time investigating behaviour in a variety of coaching contexts that we can better inform the processes of coach and coach developer training and education to ensure this vital aspect of coaching is fully and effectively addressed.

Learning outcomes:

  • To encourage coaches and coach developers to think more deeply about the impact of their behaviours and to consider where they might change their approach to express humility in their work
  • Attendees will leave with an enhanced understanding of the concept of humility; what this might look like in a variety of contexts; along with ideas of how we might overcome the barriers and challenges to behaving in this way in a professional setting

Who?

Ashley Gill and Gareth Barrett, Staffordshire University

Summary

This session will provide a greater understanding of how higher education (HE) students perceive external governing body of sport qualifications and the factors that influence participation in coach learning. This insight may be highly beneficial to both HE institutions and governing bodies of sport. Hopefully, enabling these organisations to be better placed to support future engagement in coach learning courses and ensure that their courses are accessible to all.

Learning outcomes:

  • To inform the coaching community about sports coaches of the future
  • To provide delegates with a greater understanding of how HE students perceive external governing bodies of sport qualifications and the factors that influence participation in coach learning
  • To help governing bodies of sport to be better placed to support future engagement in coach learning courses and ensure that their courses are accessible to all

Who?

Sophie Burton, El Taylor-Jenks and Harry Stow, Energise Me and Dr Daniel Lock, Bournemouth University

Summary

Our research focuses on how workforce relations can benefit LGBT+ physical activity participation. There is evidence of prejudice, discrimination and abuse in physical activity that impacts on LGBT+ participation levels, and evidence of homophobia, biphobia and transphobia in the workplace. The workforce can be an enabler for physical activity through diversity, inclusive practice and provision. To date, research on workforce relations conducive to LGBT+ physical activity engagement is limited and underexplored. 'Pride in Our Workforce' will help us develop a workforce that understands this community and gives them the confidence, skills, knowledge and motivation to lead active lifestyles.

Learning outcomes:

  • To increase understanding of the application of person-centred methodologies and utilising cross sector consultation 
  • To present whether the current workforce is representative of our local population and, if not, how we can increase the number of people from the LGBT+ community within the workforce
  • To share the role the workforce plays in the LGBT+ community when accessing physical activity and sport and how the workforce affects and influences their experience as a participant

Who?

Prof Kevin Till, Leeds Beckett and Simon Bell, Leeds Rhinos

Summary

Talent identification and development systems (TIDS) are now common practice in youth sport. Research within youth rugby league has found that TIDS often favour the identification and selection of young people who mature earlier than their peers. Based upon this research, and alongside a review of their current practices, Leeds Rhinos RLFC has designed and developed a talent development programme for later maturing players within youth rugby league.

Learning outcomes:

  • To demonstrate how research can be used to create innovative programmes that enhance development and opportunities for participants and coaches
  • To share the importance of maturity status upon the selection of adolescents to TIDS
  • To encourage delegates to consider alternative developmental programmes for later maturing individuals within youth sports

Who?

Rus Smith, StreetGames

Summary

The session will share findings from case study research undertaken to explore the impact of StreetGames’ Coach Mate Connectors programme. The case study research was designed to capture the ‘stories’ and ‘journeys’ of new coaches – predominantly, comprising of young people from lower socio-economic groups/areas of high deprivation, and the impact of the Coach Mate Connectors programme.

Learning outcomes:

  • To present the Coach Mate Connectors programme
  • To encourage delegates to consider how the diversity of the coaching workforce can be improved via programmes like Coach Mate Connectors

Who?

Joseph Richard Stanford, Nova Centurion and Nottingham Trent University

Summary

Personality traits lead to positive relationship management. This current research project explores if coaches and athletes use this in order to achieve a successful relationship. An effective working relationship is an essential consideration in the pursuit of elite athletic success. Through personality profiling and follow up interviews with elite swimmers we found that:

  • Compatibility in personalities was not always genuine due to an adopted persona
  • Specific traits lead to partnerships learning co-operatively to maintain the quality of their relationship
  •  A greater understand of trait neuroticism is needed due to its positive influence on enhancing an empathetic awareness

Learning outcomes:

  • To present personality theories and how they relate to new and existing psychological phenomena
  • To enable delegates to recognise specific personality types and how trait neuroticism has a positive influence on internal motivation
  • To provide delegates with ideas and strategies for developing desirable personality behaviours using a personality framework
  • To share how relationship malfunction can be avoided

Who?

Prof Joan Duda, University of Birmingham and Hannah Bussey, GB Archery

Summary

Empowering Coaching™, housed at the University of Birmingham, is a theory-informed and evidenced-based training programme that has been proven to make sport more engaging, enjoyable and health-conducive, leading to sustained participation. The Empowering Coaching™ team and GB Archery have been collaborating on a research project that will result in a bespoke version of the training programme for archery coaches. In this session, we will provide an overview of the multi-methodological approach and findings associated with tailoring Empowering Coaching™ for archery.

Learning outcomes:

  • To develop greater awareness of the implications of empowering and disempowering coaching behaviours on athlete (and coach) engagement and well-being
  • Delegates to gain a better understanding of how a collaborative partnership between an institution of higher education and governing body of sport can be realised with the aim to roll out a tailored and evidence-based coach learning programme
  • To share insight into how the ‘motivational health’ of a sport can be assessed via a multi-method approach

Who?

Dr Carolyn Plateau and Dr Zoe McVinnie, Loughborough University

Summary

Eating problems are common among athlete populations, with around 1-in-5 five female and 1-in-12 male athletes suffering from clinically significant eating problems. Coaches report low levels of confidence in their ability to detect eating problems in athletes, but currently no online or face-to-face educational resources exist, specifically, for coaches and sports professionals. An accredited online CPD educational programme has now been developed to support coaches and sports professionals in the identification and management of eating problems in athletes. An evaluation of the effectiveness of this programme has recently been conducted with coaches and sports practitioners.

Learning outcomes:

  • To share insight into the nature and prevalence of eating problems among athletes
  • To present an overview of the online educational resource developed for coaches
  • To highlight the role of the coach in signposting and supporting athletes with eating problems

Who?

Michael Ashford, Leeds Beckett University

Summary

Our research has been conducted within an elite rugby union context to 'define the role and development of tactics and decision-making in rugby union'. We aimed to understand how rugby players make decisions within a competitive game and how coaches can most effectively meet these demands. Four studies were conducted: i) a systematic review of current literature; ii) understanding how players make decisions; iii) how elite academy coaches use practice to most effectively develop players decisions, and iv) how rule changes and the game impact on decision-making behaviour.

Learning outcomes:

  • To describe and explain how a competitive situation shapes and influences athletes’ decision-making behaviour
  • To describe and explain each theoretical perspective's (information processing, ecological dynamics, naturalistic decision-making) implications for coaches when planning and designing practice.
  • For delegates to recognise the implications for the development experiences we design and facilitate for athletes

Who?

Tabo Huntley, Liverpool John Moores University

Summary

There is growing recognition outside of sport, that coaching plays a pivotal role in achieving social, health and performance objectives across the European Union (EU, The Work Plan for Sport 2017-2020). Despite the important role para-coaches play in achieving sporting and societal values, research suggests that a coordinated approach to the training and development of the para-coaching workforce does not exist (Thomas & Guett, 2014), leaving coaches to rely on learning experience and trial and error (Townsend et al., 2015). This, arguably, leaves the 80 million disabled people across the EU with an inconsistent array of sporting experiences.

Learning outcomes:

  • Introduce the Para Coach project and share preliminary data conducted through a workforce audit
  • To promote the learning, development and mobility of coaches across the EU
  • Encourage delegates to ensure that the unique aspects of para/disability sport are reflected in an integrated educational approach

Who?

Rebecca Skeen, University of Hertfordshire

Summary

74% of the coaching workforce in England are volunteers. These coaches potentially have gained a coaching qualification but do not actively engage in continual development, meaning much of England receives varying practices that do not make a great coaching experience. Behavioural change is high on UK Sport's agenda, therefore this emphasis on athlete-centred coaching needs to be a working philosophy for sports clubs across the country. This research explores the idea of using coaching workshops as a way to not only improve coaching development but also to use these practices to develop the participants’ professional career.

Learning outcomes:

  • To encourage delegates to consider developing the whole person, not just the coach, and how to better their overall potential 
  • To share the Transformational Leadership model and its relevance to coaching and business to maximise retention and player development
  • To present how the Transformational Leadership model can be implemented within a sporting body/community

Who?

Amy Stewart, England Netball

Summary

NET2019 is the 2019 Netball World Cup international legacy project, a three-year initiative funded by UK Sport and delivered by England Netball in partnership with the International Netball Federation (INF.) The mission of NET2019 is to empower women and girls through the power of netball and the legacy of the World Cup. The objective of this research is to provide governing bodies of sport and other stakeholders, who may be investing in legacy projects linked to major competitions and events, with shared experiences, practical tips and recommendations. It will highlight the key coaching interventions undertaken as part of the project and demonstrate how coaching galvanised under-represented groups in society to actively take part in sport and physical activity.

Learning outcomes:

  • To present evidence of the power of coaching in creating long-term sustainable change in under-represented groups and communities
  • To share useful information for governing bodies of sport to lobby national partners and funders to invest in sport specific legacy projects
  • To highlight the key coaching interventions that made a real difference to participation levels and diversifying the coaching workforce in under-represented communities, (eg coach training and qualifications; coach developer training)

Who?

Beth Thompson, UK Coaching

Summary

In this session, UK Coaching will share a qualitative research study conducted in 2019, involving over 60 subject matter experts across the sport and physical activity landscape. The aim of the research was to understand what a high-quality talent development environment looks like, and how to maximise the potential of athletes in those environments. With a specific focus on key transition points, the research explored talent development environments from an athlete, coach and system lens. UK Coaching will show how the research is being applied in practice, through close collaboration with four national governing bodies of sport, and the development of a coach learning framework.

Learning outcomes:

  • To present the key findings from the maximising potential qualitative research
  • To share progress made on the application of the research into coaching practice

Who?

Dr Sarah Hotham, University of Kent and David Reader, London Sport

Summary

Social prescribing (SP) involves the referral of patients with social or practical needs to non-clinical services. The SP workforce can play a role in reducing physical inactivity. In collaboration with London Sport, health behaviour change experts designed and delivered a workshop to increase knowledge of physical activity and improve self-efficacy in this workforce. Training covered key information, practical use of intervention methods (behaviour change techniques) and foundation motivational interviewing. SP programmes in three London boroughs were selected to participate, with 51 professionals attending. Evaluation findings indicate the workshop improved knowledge, understanding and confidence when engaging in conversations about physical activity.

Learning outcomes:

  • To present behaviour change techniques and how these can be used in practice to support positive changes in physical activity
  • To share an example of how the sporting/physical activity sector can engage with health and social care to support populations who are physically inactive and hard-to-reach

Who?

Dr Graham Turner, Australian Institute of Sport

Summary

This case study provides insight into the challenge experienced by one early career coach, when his senior international athlete 'lost' a previously learnt skill. This coaching problem presented an opportunity for Gymnastics Australia’s national elite coaching manager to support coach learning through the promotion of greater theoretical understanding.

Learning outcomes:

  • Delegates to understand the importance of creating and sustaining positive relationships with coaches to nuture self-awareness, agency and ability
  • To share an example of deliberate practice underpinned by empirical evidence used within coach development

Who?

Ed Cope, The Football Association

Summary

Research exploring coaches’ perceptions of how they learn to coach is widespread and well understood. However, what is not so clear is how coach learning opportunities leads to changes in coaches’ practice. This study drew upon the educational concepts espoused by Paulo Freire and the methodological concepts of Collaborative Action Research to inform the development of a coach learning programme, and explored how this programme impacted coaches’ practice and behaviour.

Learning outcomes:

  • To share an approach that has the potential to make coaches and players, respectively, feel an integral part of the learning process
  • Delegates will be provided with theoretical underpinning to help them make better sense of their own practice, and practical strategies with a view to changing their practice, if appropriate

Who?

Nicky Proctor, Leeds Beckett University

Summary

This session will provide early insights from research investigating how and why a coach learning and development programme works for coaches at the performance foundation stage of the athlete pathway. The Performance Foundation Coach Support programme, which adopts innovative learning approaches, such as in-situ, one-to-one development support and connected peer learning, is explored for an improved understanding of coach development practice and its influence on coaches’ expertise and the effectiveness of their practice. This research aims to offer insights through the analysis of intensive empirical findings using an embedded, relational and emergent (ERE) model of coach development practice based on critical realism.

Learning outcomes:  

  • To share early findings from research concerning the understanding of how and why coach learning and development works in particular contexts
  • To present early findings from the application of the new ERE model of sports coach learning and development, concerning its utility for coaching research

Poster Challenge

Who?

Kenneth Newlands, Staffordshire University

Summary

Players' perceptions of experiencing the constraints-led approach (CLA), with a theoretical underpinning, were explored using a grounded theory methodology, involving field observation and semi-structured interview, followed by a grounded inductive thematic analysis. Findings revealed players enjoyed the CLA, feeling improvements in multiple aspects of performance likely to continue. They learned some facets of the CLA indirectly, though had little understanding of the concept as a whole. The value of the CLA was positively articulated by most players. Future research should seek to study different performer groups and group types and investigate performers’ perceptions of their involvement in relation to performance measures.

Learning outcomes:

  • To share findings linked to players’ perceptions of experiencing a CLA to coaching in women’s football
  • To demonstrate the value of CLA from a player's perspective

Who?

Marc Crump, Blackheath Rugby Football Club and Staffordshire University

Summary

The constraints-led approach is growing in use by sports coaches in rugby union, though it has mainly studied unstructured play. Rugby union contains multiple periods of structured play where pre-planned strategies can be used to de-stabilise opposing systems. This research uses semi-structured interviews to examine coach experiences of using the constraint led approach to teach pre-planned strategies. During the interviews the participants cited a number of barriers when using the approach. To operationalise findings, a model for using CLA was designed. This study provides the basis for more sport-specific research into using the constraints-led approach.

Learning outcomes:

  • To present coach experiences of using the constraints-led approach to teach pre-planned strategies
  • To share examples of how practitioner understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of ecological dynamics will improve practice

Who?

Leanne Burton, Liverpool John Moores University

Summary

Community parks play a role in facilitating social interactions and community cohesion and provide physical activity opportunities. Despite family being considered an important vehicle for shaping children’s physical activity behaviours, research has shown that encouraging family co-participation in physical activity, particularly hard-to-reach populations, can be difficult. Supporting coaches to develop additional skills beyond ‘traditional’ coaching skills is vital when working with difficult to engage populations. ‘Open Goals’ (OG) is a family programme delivered by Liverpool FC Foundation, consisting of two-hour multi-sport weekly sessions across 15 parks. This study used a mixed-methods process evaluation to investigate the implementation and impact of OG.

Learning outcomes:

  • To share the Open Goals programme including its impact
  • To present evidence behind multi-sport physical activity community programmes, and how they can be used to connect with local communities to encourage physical activity

Who?

Gareth Barrett, Staffordshire University

Summary

This project intends to analyse women rugby union coaches’ experiences of coaching; transitions from athlete to coaching, and formal coach learning across rugby union contexts in the United Kingdom. Data was be collected through semi-structured interviews. Furthermore, it explored areas of organisational cultures that facilitate the development and progression of women as rugby coaches and provided some insight to the current landscape of women’s rugby.

Learning outcomes:

  • To share the ecological model of barriers and support women rugby coaches are experiencing
  • To identify recommendations for future rugby coach learning to support women coaches

Who?

Craig White, Loughborough University

Summary

This study trials a 'Leading for Resilience' programme with four existing RAF teams. The programme is based on the results of our previous two studies, existing research on Social Identity Leadership (SIL), and the 5R leadership development programme (Haslam et al., 2017). The programme focuses on developing resilience as well as improving health and well-being, through building a stronger connection to the team and enhancing SIL.  

Learning outcomes:

  • To understand the framework of the 'Leading for Resilience' programme
  • To share how the 'Leading for Resilience' programme can be used within sports teams to develop relationships and build a stronger team identity, thereby enhancing the resilience and health and well-being of the team members
  • To provide details on who to contact for more information on the 'Leading for Resilience' programme

Who?

Phoebe Schecter, Buffalo Bills 

Summary

When I started in the National Football League (NFL), there was only one other female in a coaching role, and before her, only one in a full time role. To date, there are three females working in coaching roles and slowly, the numbers within other roles are growing. Historically, it has always been a male dominated sport as it was predominantly only played by men. With the growth of the non-contact version, flag football, more females got involved and eventually contact leagues for women grew. Once the passion grew, and the appreciation of the sport flourished, more and more females looked into becoming coaches. For a lot of people, the opportunity was never there before, as there was no one that 'looked like them' in those roles. However, that is slowly changing and the effects have been nothing but positive. 

Learning outcomes:

  • To share ideas for increasing opportunities for under-represented groups
  • To promote the benefits and remove fears of trying to have a more diverse programme

Time For You

Who?

Jordan Harry, StudyFast

Summary

Many of us would like to read more but simply do not have the time with study commitments. Whether you want to learn a new language, a new skill or simply read more books than ever before Jordan will show you how.

During the session, the following will be covered:

  •  How to break the habits holding your reading speed back
  •  The strategy to read a book a day
  •  The impact reading more has on your life

 You can always make more money, but you cannot make more time.

Who?

Andy Bradshaw, UK Coaching

Summary

During this session, we will practically explore the different ways and styles of reflecting. Using the experience of the conference as the context, we will ask you to stretch yourself and reflect in ways that you wouldn’t normally. Our intention is to highlight how alternative approaches might provoke different thinking and possibly generate deeper insight.

Who?

Liz Burkinshaw, UK Coaching

Summary

Are you curious about Sketchnoting* and how it could help you in your practice?

This session will be a quick sprint on how to get started with a new skill, including a few warmup activities and some confidence building tasks before you set your own personal challenge.

A few things to know about Sketchnoting:

  • It is for you and your own learning
  • It is all about the ideas you have and not about being an artist
  • You will get better with practice

*Sketchnoting is another name for ‘visual note taking’ and is associated with dual coding theory. It can be applied in many ways, including as part of reflective practice, notetaking in sessions, summarising chapters in books, identifying key points in a journal article or research paper, or as a way to collect new ideas.

Who?

Prof Ben Oakley, The Open University and Louisa Arnold, Kent Sport

Summary

Fancy stretching your legs and taking a tour around the stadium?

This session will provide delegates with a 20-minute stadium tour along with the opportunity to chat to the editors of UK Coaching's Research Journal. The editors will be on hand to discuss future submissions and answer any of your questions about the journal. 

Who?

Edel Quin, University of Chichester

Summary

Join this brief practical session to relieve any mental and physical tension. No difficult choreography or challenging steps, just moving to the music and dancing it out!

Applied Coaching Research Conference 2019 – Shaping the Future of Coaching 

 

This year's research conference took place on the 19 February at Derby County Football Club.

On the day, delegates were treated to a fantastic keynote from Football Association of Wales' Tony Strudwick and a 30-minute panel discussion on coach well-being.  

Delegates also experienced a variety of workshops that focused on one of three sub-themes:

  • Innovative coaching practice
  • Coach experience and well-being
  • Contemporary learning solutions

Shaping the Future of Coaching

On a bright, fresh winter’s day, nearly 150 coaching practitioners and researchers descended on Pride Park to ‘Shape the Future of Coaching’... relive our Applied Coaching Research Conference 2019

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